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A notice from our Special Education Director about SB10:

   

May 19, 2014

RE: Georgia Special Needs Scholarship

 

Dear Parent:

     As the parent of a student who receives special education in our school system, we wanted to let you know about your options to exercise public and private school choice. Under a new state law passed by the Georgia State Legislature in 2007, parents of students who receive special education may choose to transfer their child to another public school or private school in Georgia. While you are not required to exercise the options outlined below, I did want you to be aware of the choices.  I would like to stress that the Baldwin County School system will continue to do an excellent job in educating exceptional needs students and we will continue to serve the needs of students with disabilities at all schools in the system.

Public School Choice Options

     A parent can request a transfer to another public school within their school system as long as there is available space at that school and the school has a program with the services agreed to in the student´s existing individualized education program.  If the parent chooses this option, then the parent shall be responsible for transportation to the school. 

     The parent may request a transfer to a school in another school system if there is available space and the system and school has a program with the services agreed to in the student´s existing individualized education program. A school system must agree to accept the student however.  If the parent chooses this option and the school system accepts the child, then the parent shall be responsible for transportation to a school in that system.

     The parent may also request a transfer to one of the state schools for the deaf and/or blind operated by the State Board of Education. Acceptance into a state school will depend if that setting is appropriate for the student´s needs.  If the parent chooses this option, then the parent shall be responsible for transportation to the state school. Please contact the Georgia Department of Education for more information about transferring to a State School.

Private School Choice Option

     If you are interested in transferring your child to a private school in Georgia, you may be able to take advantage of a Georgia Special Needs Scholarship.  These scholarships provide funding that can be used to offset tuition costs at participating private schools in the state of Georgia.  For more information on the Georgia Special Needs Scholarship and the parent application process, please visit the Georgia Department of Education’s website at http://public.doe.k12.ga.us/.

Sincerely,

 

 

 

Geneva Braziel, Superintendent

 

Notice from School Nutrition Department

                                                                            Information about Provision 2 Funding

 

Special Assistance Certification and Reimbursement Alternatives II

(Special Provision 2)

LETTER TO HOUSEHOLDS

NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH/SCHOOL BREAKFAST PROGRAM

Baldwin County School System

 Dear Parent/Guardian:

Children need healthy meals to learn. The Baldwin County School System offers healthy meals every school day at no charge to your child(ren). Our food service receives support from the U.S. Department of Agriculture through the National School Lunch and School Breakfast programs. To determine the amount of Federal support to which we are entitled, we request that you complete a Free & Reduced Price Meal application as soon as possible, sign it, and return it to your child’s school cafeteria.

TO HELP THE SCHOOL PROVIDE FREE OR REDUCED-PRICE MEALS TO YOUR CHILD/CHILDREN, YOU MUST COMPLETE A FREE AND REDUCED-PRICE SCHOOL MEAL APPLICATION. WE CANNOT APPROVE AN APPLICATION THAT IS NOT COMPLETE, SO BE SURE TO FILL OUT ALL REQUIRED INFORMATION. RETURN THE COMPLETED APPLICATION TO: Jeanne Starr, 110 North ABC Street, Milledgeville, GA 31061; phone 478-457-3315.

Here are answers to questions you may have about applying:

1. Who can get free or reduced-price meals? Children in households getting SNAP or TANF, and most foster children, can get free meals regardless of your income. Also, if your household income is within the limits on the Federal Income Chart, your child/children can get free or reduced-price meals.

 

 

 

2. Can foster children get free meals? Yes, foster children that are under the legal responsibility of a foster care agency or court, are eligible for free meals. Any foster child in the household is eligible for free meals regardless of income.

Yes, foster children that are under the legal responsibility of a foster care agency or court, are eligible for free meals. Any foster child in the household is eligible for free meals regardless of income.

3. Will the information I give be checked? Yes, we may ask you to send written proof of the information you give.

Yes, we may ask you to send written proof of the information you give.

4. What if I stop getting SNAP or TANF? If your child qualifies or if your children qualify because you listed a SNAP or TANF case number, you do not have to inform the school when you no longer get SNAP or TANF.

If your child qualifies or if your children qualify because you listed a SNAP or TANF case number, you do not have to inform the school when you no longer get SNAP or TANF.

5. I get WIC. Can my child(ren) get free meals? Children in households participating in WIC may be eligible for free or reduced-price meals. Please fill out an application.

Children in households participating in WIC may be eligible for free or reduced-price meals. Please fill out an application.

6. If I don't qualify now, may I apply again later? Yes. You may apply at any time during the school year if your household size goes up, income goes down, or if you start getting SNAP or TANF. If you lose your job, your child/children may be able to get free or reduced-price meals during the time you are unemployed.

Yes. You may apply at any time during the school year if your household size goes up, income goes down, or if you start getting SNAP or TANF. If you lose your job, your child/children may be able to get free or reduced-price meals during the time you are unemployed.

7. What if I disagree with the school's decision about my application? You should talk to school officials. You also may ask for a hearing by calling: Jeanne Starr, School Nutrition Director, 478-457-3315.

 

 

You should talk to school officials. You also may ask for a hearing by calling:

If you have other questions or need help, call Kathy Morgan, Free/Reduced Clerk, 478-457-2956.

8. Si necesita ayuda, por favor llame al teléfono: Jeanne Starr, School Nutrition Director, 478-457-3315.

Si vous voudriez d'aide, contactez nous au numero: Kathy Morgan, Free/Reduced Clerk, 478-457-2956.

 

 

 

 

 

Sincerely,

Jeanne Starr

School Nutrition Director 2013-2014 Attachment F

2013-2014 Attachment F

 

FEDERAL ELIGIBILITY INCOME CHART

For School Year 2013-2014

Household size

Yearly

Monthly

Twice Per Month

Every Two Weeks

Weekly

1

21,257

1,772

886

818

409

2

28,694

2,392

1,196

1,104

552

3

36,131

3,011

1,506

1,390

695

4

43,568

3,631

1,816

1,676

838

5

51,005

4,251

2,126

1,962

981

6

58,442

4,871

2,436

2,248

1,124

7

65,879

5,490

2,745

2,534

1,267

8

73,316

6,110

3,055

2,820

1,410

Each additional person:

+7,437

+620

+310

+287

+144

Privacy Act Statement: This explains how we will use the information you give us.

The Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act requires the information on this application. You do not have to give the information, but if you do not, we cannot approve your child for free or reduced price meals. You must include the last four digits of the social security number of the adult household member who signs the application. The last four digits of the social security number is not required when you apply on behalf of a foster child or you list a Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Program or Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR) case number or other FDPIR identifier for your child or when you indicate that the adult household member signing the application does not have a social security number. We will use your information to determine if your child is eligible for free or reduced price meals, and for administration and enforcement of the lunch and breakfast programs. We MAY share your eligibility information with education, health, and nutrition programs to help them evaluate, fund, or determine benefits for their programs, auditors for program reviews, and law enforcement officials to help them look into violations of program rules.

Non-discrimination Statement: This explains what to do if you believe you have been treated unfairly. "In accordance with Federal Law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call toll free (866) 632-9992 (Voice). Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339; or (800) 845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer."

Keeping our students safe online


A new booklet was just released by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and other government agencies that helps parents and teachers steer kids safely through the online and mobile-phone worlds. Please feel free to download your own copy! 

English Version

Consent to Administer Medication Form
Middle and Elementary School Dress Code

Mandatory School Uniforms for all Baldwin County Elementary and Middle Schools

School uniforms help to booster a child's self esteem and encourage the main focus in the classroom to be on education and not fashion.  The potential benefits of school uniforms include instilling discipline, helping students resist peer pressure, and helping school officials recognize intruders who come to the school.  Elementary and middle school students will be expected to wear uniforms Monday - Friday.  Principals may occasionally allow a dress down day on Friday.  Below you will find a detailed list of the approved dress codes for both the elementary and middle schools:

Elementary and Middle School Uniforms Will Consist of the Following:

Girls and Boys

Polo shirts        Red, Black, White and School Color (To be determined by principal) (No T-shirts)

Dress Shirts     Red, Black, White and School Color (To be determined by principal)

Turtlenecks     Red, Black, White and School Color (To be determined by principal)

Long Pants       Khaki, Black or Navy Blue (No Denim Material)

Shorts              Khaki, Black, or Navy Blue (No Denim Material)

Skirts               Khaki, Black, or Navy Blue (No Denim Material)

Skorts              Khaki, Black, or Navy Blue (No Denim Material)

 Dresses            Khaki, Black, or Navy Blue (No Denim Material)

Specific grade level colors for Oak Hill Middle School

        6th Grade       Yellow or Gold

                         7th Grade       Light Blue or Navy Blue

        8th Grade       Hunter Green

 Approved by the Board of Education at the April 14, 2009 meeting

 

Parent Information

If you do not have ADOBE reader get it free here:
http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html

 

        Educational Websites      

http://www.schoolexpress.com/

 http://www.share2learn.com/webskidsparents.html

 http://www.internet4classrooms.com/subject_area.htm

http://www.do2learn.com/

http://www.gamequarium.com/

http://www.embark.com
Useful college-application site for parents, students, teachers. EMBARK is a student portal that allows students, parents, and counselors to find information about colleges, applications, financial aid, and more. Users can use the search tools to find the undergraduate or graduate school that fits their needs by using the advanced school finder or search by school name and make application; learn about financing a college education and apply for a loan right from the page; research information comparing federal and private loans; and read articles about the admissions process, majors, degrees, careers, and more. With a free registration students and parents can keep track of all college applications and loan applications as well as make the application process easy by storing a profile that will auto-fill the applications for each college and print them out in pdf format.

10 Things Parents Can Do to Help Their Child's Teacher

reprinted with permission from Susan McLester
                         Editor in Chief, HotChalk.com  

  1. Get on the radar. Introduce yourself to your child’s teacher(s) at the beginning of the school year. Let them know you’re planning to be involved in your student’s academic life and you’re looking forward to ongoing communication.

  2. Establish the best method for quick contact. Ask the teachers about the best, most timely method for contacting them, and tell them how best to contact you, as well. Options might be email, text messaging, instant messaging, cell phone or home phone.

  3. Attend scheduled school events. Show your involvement by showing up at as many school events as you can, including back to school, open house, holiday events, PTSA meetings, and especially parent-teacher conferences.

  4. Volunteer. If possible, volunteer a few hours a week or a month in your child’s classroom. Other possibilities include chaperoning field trips, school dances, car washes, fundraisers or other events.

  5. Stay updated on your child’s progress. Set up regular times to visit the school and chat with the teacher informally, or check in regularly with friendly emails or phone calls to see how your students is progressing and what you might do to support his or her learning.

  6. Share your expertise. Organize a phone or email tree to parents in your child’s class. Ask parents about their areas of expertise and see if they might be willing to donate some time to help out the school with any needs they might have. For instance, if they have technology skills, they might help them build a web presence. If they have writing skills they might send out regular parent newsletters with updates on what students are doing in class, and what is coming up.

  7. Talk to your child about responsible Internet practices. Every school has an AUP (Acceptable Use Policy). Be sure to ask your child about this document, and then sit down with him or her and go over the different elements of the policy to be sure you both understand what is acceptable and safe behavior online. {Our policy is located here}

  8. Spearhead a tutoring or homework help program. Math tutors, writing coaches and adults or older students who can help walk students through their assignments can often be the different between success and failure.

  9. Help expand classroom resources. Point your child’s teachers to Web resources they’ll find helpful. For instance, there are numerous online tutoring sites (such as Hotmath.com) that offer free or low-cost help in core subjects, and HotChalk.com offers thousands of free, teacher-tested lesson plans in all curricular areas.

  10. Raise funds. In today’s cash-strapped world of education, fundraising can be crucial to schools’ ability to purchase the education resources they need. Beyond traditional methods, such as bake sales, writing and winning grants can mean serious money for technology, digital resources and other 21st century teaching tools.
General Study Skills Help & Study Tips

Students with better study methods and strategies score higher on their exams
as reprinted from
http://www.testtakingtips.com/parents/index.htm

Everyone is different, different methods work for different people the following are only suggestions on improving upon your current studying techniques.

It is best to review the material right after class when it's still fresh in your memory.

Don't try to do all your studying the night before the test, instead space out your studying, review class materials at least several times a week, focusing on one topic at a time.

Have all of your study material in front of you: lecture notes, course textbooks, study guides and any other relevant material.

Find a comfortable and quiet place to study with good lighting and little distractions (try avoiding your own bed; it is very tempting to just lie down and take a nap).

Start out by studying the most important information.

Learn the general concepts first; don't worry about learning the details until you have learned the main ideas.

Take notes and write down a summary of the important ideas as you read through your study material.

Take short breaks frequently, you memory retains the information that you study at the beginning and the end better than what you study in the middle.

Space out your studying, you'll learn more by studying a little every day instead of waiting to cram at the last minute. By studying everyday, the material will stay in your long-term memory but if you try to study at the last moment, the material will only reside in your short-term memory that you'll easily forget.

Make sure that you understand the material well, don't just read through the material and try to memorize everything.

If you choose to study in a group, only study with others who are serious about the test.

Test yourself or have someone test you on the material to find out what your weak and strong areas are. You can use the review questions at the end of each chapter or practice tests the teacher may give out as well as other materials.

Listening to relaxing music such as classical or jazz on a low volume can relieve some of the boredom of studying.

Don't study later than the time you usually go to sleep, you may fall asleep or be tempted to go to sleep, instead try studying in the afternoon or early evening. If you are a morning person try studying in the morning.